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The Alpha Omicron Lambda Chapter, of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and the Community Empowerment Association are in the midst of a battle over a building property in the Homewood neighborhood (see "CEA fights battle on two fronts" in the Dec. 2 issue). Both organizations issued proposals to buy the building currently being leased by the CEA, an organization working to reduce crime and violence across the city. However, the Homewood Brushton Hevitalization and Development Corp. that owns the...
While almost every other property owner in Pittsburgh was waiting to hear Judge Stanton Wettick's ruling on tax assessments, Jan. 12, Community Empowerment Association founder Rashad Byrdsong was at the Urban Redevelopment Authority board meeting learning his agency had been approved for $250,000 in new funding. Authority Executive Director Rob Stephany said the funding item was not even on the meeting agenda, he "walked it in" because it is important. The funds will allow CEA to amend...
Joined by more than 20 supporters, Community Empowerment Association founder Rashad Byrdsong told the Urban Redevelopment Board their practices were detrimental to the Black community in Homewood. Byrdsong apologized in advance for his comments prior to the start of the June 9 board meeting, then charged the authority had shafted him-mainly because there were no Blacks in high management positions since Mulu Birru left as director. He said Homewood has been ignored to the point where...
The conference "Mitigating the Impact of Social and Psychological Trauma to the Social Fabric of the African American Community," held Oct. 26-27, used a public health perspective to study the rampant violence of the African-American community. This framework was used throughout the conference to develop an action plan to carry on the work done by the scholars, community activists and spiritual leaders who participated. "This is the first conference that I know of that was convened by a...
Spirits were high among the hundreds of Black men that rallied Downtown during the June 23 Day of Solidarity. However, many of them also questioned what would happen in the coming days. "One of the most frequently or often repeated questions I've heard leading up to the 23rd and after is 'Okay, what's next?"' said Malik Bankston, executive director of Kingsley Association and a co-convener of the Day of Solidarity. "An answer to that question is the answer that everybody is looking to us...